Sustainable Gardening – Pest Prevention and Management

Sustainable Gardening – Pest Prevention and Management By Ewa Bekiesch – Permaculture Designer and Sustainable Living Consultant I recently wrote this article for our local magazine “The Beacon”  🙂 – Ewa website: www.permaculturehaven.com email: permaculturehaven@gmail.com There is no pest in a permaculture garden. Insects are very important as primary or secondary decomposers. Without insects, dead animals and plants would accumulate in our environment and it would get very messy. Some insects aerate the soil, the others pollinate blossoms, control other insects and plants or leave pests. Insects are helping us in creating the topsoil which we need to grow plants. When you spray chemical pesticides in the garden, you are… Read More

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Permaculture Gardening – Keyhole Garden

Permaculture Gardening – Keyhole Garden recommended by Ewa Bekiesch – certified Permaculture designer and educator, sustainable living consultant – Permaculture Haven An amazing all in one solution. Great for any size of garden. Perfect for small size backyard. The keyhole garden is a combination of a compost bin and a raised garden bed. The compost bin is functioning like any other compost bin and should be treated like that. However, no need to remove the compost Think about keeping the right balance of TWO parts of brown material : ONE part of greens. Worms and microorganisms will turn the garden waste into natural fertiliser and enrich soil in the the… Read More

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Poor Man’s Bean – The Forgotten Bean

This is the article I wrote for our local magazine The Beacon issue #12 Poor Man’s Bean – The Forgotten Bean by Ewa Bekiesch, Permaculture Consultant, Designer and Educator Poor Man’s Bean – also known as Old man beans, Hyacinth beans, Dolichos, Lablab beans, Rongai bean, Fuji mame I just love easy to grow vegetables and the Poor Man’s Bean is one of them. It is a short-lived perennial and according to a lovely lady I got the seeds from, it has been grown in Australia for a very long time. It has beautiful dark green leaves, the flowers are deep pink and purple and the young pods are pale… Read More

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Create an Insect Friendly Garden and Help Saving the Planet

This is the article I wrote for our local magazine The Beacon issue #12 Create an Insect Friendly Garden and Help Saving the Planet by Ewa Bekiesch, Permaculture Consultant, Designer and Educator   Our Life Depends on Insects Bug extinction is one of the most extensive extinctions on the planet. It’s scary because you don’t notice it until it’s too late (Worrall, 2017). According to a recent study (ScienceDirect, 2019), over 40% of insect species are threatened with extinction. Having in mind, that most of our food is insect dependent, this is an alarming and very worrying prognosis. “If insects were to disappear, the world would fall apart — there’s no two… Read More

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Fruit Tree Guild – Grow Healthy Food… Under Your Tree!

This is the article I wrote for our local Fraser Coast QLD magazine “The Beacon” Grow Healthy Food… Under Your Tree! There many different ways of growing healthy food: in pots, wicking beds, different kind of raised garden beds, hugelkultur, aquaponics, vertical garden, the list goes on. Depends on the space and available materials, you might choose one or many different ways of growing food in your garden. One of my favorites is growing food under the trees. The space under the tree is mostly forgotten and it would be a shame not to use it. This method of growing food is called the Permaculture Guild and it is about companion… Read More

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Manihot esculenta – Cassava, Manioc, Yuca

This is the article I wrote for our local magazine The Beacon Story and Images by Ewa Bekiesch, Permaculture designer, educator, gardener and healthy home grown food advocate. Ewa has also the Food As Medicine certificate from the Monash University. Manihot esculenta – Cassava, Manioc, Yuca Versatile, delicious, drought-tolerant and quick and easy growing vegetable. Cassava is a perennial woody shrub up to 3-4m, native to South America, growing best in tropical and subtropical regions around the globe. It is a very hardy plant and grows in nearly any type of soil. We grow it in our food forest for quite few years now. I have planted it in many different spots and… Read More

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Grow It! Eat It! Use It! The Sponge Gourd – Luffa aegyptiaca, Egyptian cucumber, Vietnamese luffa

This is the article I wrote for our local Fraser Coast magazine The Beacon: Sustainable Living Choices On The Fraser CoastGrow It! Eat It! Use It! The Sponge Gourd – Scientific name: Luffa aegyptiaca Other names: Egyptian cucumber, or Vietnamese luffa The Sponge Gourd or simply Luffa, is one of the plants I wouldn’t like to miss in our food forest. It has many uses, it loves our hot Summer days and the bees love it, too 🙂 It has been well known and used since the time of the Late Roman Empire. The young fruits and leaves are used as a vegetable and can be cooked in many ways or eaten… Read More

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The Black Elderberry, European Elderberry – Sambucus Nigra

This is the article I wrote for our local magazine “The Beacon” in the 7th edition Story and images by Ewa Bekiesch – Permaculture Designer and Educator, Gardener, Healthy Food Lover Mythical… Magical… Medicinal… Beautiful… Delicious… And it loves to grow in our backyards all over Australia! The Black Elderberry, The European Elderberry – Sambucus nigra I don’t see many of them growing around and that is why I love to share with you some information about this beautiful and useful plant. It is very pretty, frost resistant, bees love it, chickens love it and you can use it in so many ways! According to Wolf-Dieter Storl (trained professional anthropologist)… Read More

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Permaculture Sustainable Vegetable Gardening - The complete guide

Syntropic Agriculture and Permaculture

Syntropic Agriculture and Permaculture by Ewa Bekiesch I’ve been asked few times what is syntropic farming and whether we apply the syntropic farming methods into our permaculture gardening, courses and designs. Short answer: YES! Then comes the next question, what is the difference? Or is there any? Note: apart from the quoted texts in this article, any views or opinions are my own. First of all, let’s get into the bottom of it and find out what the word syntropy actually means. It actually comes from Greek syn=together, tropos=tendency and according to the Wiktionary, the free dictionary (wiktionary.org): “It was first coined by the mathematician Luigi Fantappiè, in 1941, in… Read More

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